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Pronouns

      INTIMATE PRONOUNS

            In some languages (e.g. Spanish), pronouns are either regular or intimate.  Family members and friends are addressed with an intimate pronoun (Spanish tu, you); acquaintances and strangers are addressed with regular pronouns (Spanish usted, you).  Therefore a speaker, when addressing an acquaintance, to switch from regular to intimate pronoun (in Spanish, from usted to tu).  An acquaintance addressed with an intimate form of “you” feels emotional warmth from the speaker, a welcoming into the speaker’s fold of family and close friends.  This ability to switch from a regular to an intimate way of saying “you” is an important feature of social cohesion among speakers of Hindi, Spanish, Portuguese, German, and dozens of other languages.  It is missing in English, but not in Peoplese.

            Peoplese pronouns:                       


INTIMATE REGULAR

uu you  (informal, singular)

uus yous  (informal, plural)  E.g. I love uus.

uu's you's  (possessive of "you", singular)   E.g. Girl, don't forget uu's books.

uus' yous'  (possessive of "yous", plural)

uus∙both yous both  (used when needed for clarity, to indicate two only; rarely used)

uus∙both’s possessive of "uus∙both"

uus∙all yous all  (used when needed to emphasize "all"; rarely used.  English "y'all".

uus∙all’s possessive of "uus∙all".

            When translating dialog between family members to Peoplese from a language like Spanish which commonly uses intimate pronoun,  “you” must be translated as “oo”, etc.


        ARCHAIC  PRONOUNS

            In English, archaic pronouns are seldom used, but appear in ancient texts, e.g. the Bible.  They are also available in Peoplese.

            Peoplese pronouns:                          


INTIMATE REGULAR ARCHAIC

oo you thou

oo you thee  (objective of "thou", used as object of a verb or preposition)

oos yous ye  (plural of "thou")

oo's, oos' your, yours thy  (possessive of "thou")


     POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS

            All possessive pronoun forms below are acceptable.  

            Singular, one-syllable "you's" is distinguishable from plural two-syllable "yous's". 

            "My" requires an object; e.g. "my house".  "Mine" is used without an object, e.g. "The house is mine."

                    "Me's" can be used with or without an object.:  e.g. "me's house, the house is me's" 

            "It's" is the possessive of "it"; it does not mean (as in English) "it is".

            Peoplese pronouns:.                      



SINGULAR PLURAL

1st person my, my's, mine, me's our, we's

2nd person your, you's your, yous's (pronouned as two syllables)

3rd person his, he's, hers, she's, it's theirs they


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