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Peoplese Spelling
"Alike English"


The Alike English version of Peoplese spelling is Peoplese language with slightly regularized English spelling.  Its function is to allow English speakers an effortless way to familiarize themselves with the many outstanding features of Peoplese, all of which are delineated on this website.  Once that is accomplished, the logical next step is to coordinate the sounds of the words with how they are spelled -- hence, the Sound Spell Same version of Peoplese spelling.

MS Word SPELLCHECK.  You may add Peoplese as a spelling option to MS Word's spellcheck feature.  Gratis.  Once done, your English text will underline in red all words not in Peoplese.  For instructions, click here.

CONTENTS OF THIS PAGE (click on any word):
            Capitalization
            Singular and Plural Nouns
            Ordinal Numbers
            Abbreviationss and Acronyms
            Romanitazation


    CAPITALIZATION


             In Peoplese, the following are capitalized.
                        The first word of every sentence.
                        Proper names:  names of specific places, ethnicitys, languages, organizations, people, brands,
                                         and so on.
                                    Ex:  city Rio de Janeiro, Albert Einstein, Arab
۔ese, United Nations, Kuhio Avenue.
                                    Ex:  Cambridge University, planet Mars, Sind province, ABC Corporation.
                        Astronomical and geographical entities, such as galaxies, stars, planets, moons.
                                    Ex:  Earth, Milky Way galaxy, Lake Malawi, Mount Kilimanjaro, River Jordan
                        Taiyang is the Peoplese word for Earth’s star.
                        Yueliang is the Peoplese word for Earth’s moon.  (Both words from Mandarin Chinese.)
                        Titles of books, magazines, movies, plays, fiction stories, essays, poems.
                         “Internet” is capitalized (but not preceded by the article “the”). Islam, and Bahai religions.
                                    Synonyms for the one God -- e.g. who, messiah, mastor, father -- are likewise capitalized.

             In Peoplese, the following are not capitalized except at the beginning of sentences:
                        Species words.  Ex:  maple tree, lotus flower, sparrow, monkey, people.
                        With hyphenated words, the subsequent words after the first word.
                                    Whether or not the initial word is capitalized, the word following the hyphen is not.
                        “god” except when referring to the one God of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Bahai religions.  
                                    Ex:  Greek gods.
                        “the sun”, “the moon”.  Suns (stars) and moons are generic words, therefore not capitalized.
                        Titles preceding proper names.
                                    Ex:  misses Johns, miss Jones, king Tut, primeministor Kio, president Lee, doctor No,
                                                miz Sugarfoot (English:  Ms. Sugarfoot), professor Higgins, dentist Sapperstein,
                                                father Brown, prophet Mohammad, mister Lin, doctorate Moore, teachort Gens,
                                                lawyer Khan, carpentorm Chivvis.

 Pronouns. Peoplese is an international language, so what is considered divine to some may not be considered divine to others.  Thus, pronouns referring to spiritual messengers, including Jesus, are not generally capitalized – although they may be capitalized, depending on the writer's preference.

 

        SINGULAR & PLURAL NOUNS

                        Nouns are categorized as singular (only one) and plural (more than one).

                        Noun-roots are singular, meaning only one.  Ex:  shoe, arm, pain, dish.

                        Peoplese has no irregular plural nouns.
                                    Ex:  mouses, mans, oxes, swines, phenomenons, taxis, dices, fishes, foots, mans,
                                                tooths, radiuses, mooses, leafs, alumnas, bacteriums, crisises.
                                    Ex:  English “person” → Peoplese “people”, Englsh “people” → Peoplese “peoples”.
                                                One people, two peoples.

                        Peoplese "children” is an an endearing plural form of “childs”; both “children” and “childs” may be used.
                                    Ex:  All childs must begin school by age five years.  Have our children finish
۔d eat۔ing?

                        Form for plural noun:  noun-root + s, except when noun ends in h, x, s, or z,
                                    in which case the plural is formed by adding “es” to the noun.
                                    Ex:  shoes, arms, pains, dishes, axes, oasises, datums, quizes.

                        Foreign noun imports are fine, but their plurals follow Peoplese, not foreign, plural rules.
                                    Ex:  alumnus, alumnuses; bacterium, bacteriums; nebula, nebulas

                        When we mean more than one, we use plurals.
                                    Ex:  He catch۔d three fishes.  She have blond hairs. 
                                    Ex:  three-meters high wall.  [English:  three-meter high wall.]
                                    Ex:  an eighty-euros expense.  [English:  an eight-euro expenss.] horses race.  [English:  horse race]
                                    Ex:  three hillcrests away.  two brother۔inlaws.  two truck۔ets of the same brand

                        Nouns are also categorized as countable and uncountable.  (see grammar section)
                                    Uncountable nouns (e.g. water, joy) do not take plural endings.


        ORDINAL NUMBERS

                        An ordinal number designates a position in an ordered sequence.

  Ex:  first, thirty-second, one-thousandth, 13۔th, 2nd, 101st

                        Ordinal numbers can be used as nouns and as adnouns.

                                  Ex:  In the speedrace he finish۔d third.  A third of the learnclass fail۔d the exam.